Fake Fentanyl Pills Disguised as Xanax & Norco

fake Xanax

Fentanyl is a very potent synthetic opioid that was originally developed for medical practices beginning in the 1960s. Fentanyl is like morphine but up to 100 times stronger. In recent years Fentanyl has been widely used to cut heroin to increase the intoxicating effects to cause more euphoria. Fentanyl is responsible for causing accidental overdoses leading to death all across the country and globe. Fentanyl is produced and prescribed legally for people who suffer from severe chronic pain.

It is, however, also produced illegally in China and Mexico and sold illegally in the drug addiction culture throughout the United States. More and more drug dealers are buying Fentanyl illegally to cut heroin and even other non-opioid drugs that are sold on the streets.

fake Xanax

CBS News reported that one person in San Francisco died and eight others were hospitalized after they took what they believed to be Xanax, when in fact the Xanax look-a-like pills contained Fentanyl. CBS News has reported the following:

At least one San Francisco-area drug user died, and eight more landed in the ER in late 2015 after taking counterfeit Xanax tablets that had been cut with a powerful and dangerous opiate…The nine people all had taken tablets that looked very similar to prescription Xanax, down to bearing the same pharmaceutical markings as the legitimate anxiety drug.

Dr. Ann Arens, a former ER physician at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital said that the tablets had been definitely cut with fentanyl.

They look exactly the same, and the users that were exposed to these tablets had no idea it was anything other than what they thought they were buying. (CBS News).

When buying pills off the streets, addicts never truly know what’s in them. Often they are cut with other chemicals and narcotics, making this behavior especially risky and dangerous.

Fentanyl Found in Fake Xanax and Norco Pills

When it comes to Norco, this is a prescription pain reliever that contains hydrocodone and acetaminophen, and when sold on the streets has also been found to contain Fentanyl. The New York Times reported that:

The victims took what they believed to be Norco, a prescription drug made up of acetaminophen and hydrocodone that is used to treat pain” as stated by Laura McCasland, a spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services. (NYT)

Unfortunately, both these cases are representative of how viscous the illegal Fentanyl drug trade is and that it is not only heroin addicts who are dying and at risk. The illegal manufacturing of Fentanyl has caused a huge increase of death amongst the drug addict culture. The Center for Disease Control, CDC, reports that the increase in 2017 of accidental opioid overdoses is related to the illegally produced Fentanyl.

Overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids other than methadone, which includes fentanyl, increased by almost 47% from 2016 to 2017. Roughly 28,400 people died from overdoses involving synthetic opioids other than methadone in 2017. Reports from law enforcement indicate that much of the synthetic opioid overdose increase may be due to illegally or illicitly made fentanyl. According to data from the National Forensic Laboratory Information System, confiscations, or seizures, of Fentanyl increased by nearly 7-fold from 2012 to 2014. There were 4,585 Fentanyl confiscations in 2014. This suggests that the sharp rise in fentanyl-related deaths may be due to the increased availability of illegally made, non-pharmaceutical fentanyl, and not prescribed fentanyl. (CDC)

The problem of Fentanyl laced drugs is no longer restricted to heroin or other opiate drug addicts. In the past Fentanyl was a heroin addicts problem, now that it is being found in other drugs, the illegal manufacturing is reaching other types of addicts. The plain truth is the reality of how dangerous it is to be a drug addict in general but even more so with Fentanyl in existence. The solution is to end the problem of addiction. Without addiction, there would be no illegal drug manufacturing and or accidental overdoses. If you or a loved one is addicted to drugs, there is a way to prevent the disease of addiction from causing an accidental overdose or death.

The programs at Recreate Life Counseling are successful because they treat specific addictions and provide each client with individualized treatment. If you or your family member needs help for an addiction, reach out to one of our treatment program representatives. They will be able to get you or your loved one admitted quickly.

Can You Vape Crack Cocaine?

Can You Vape Crack Cocaine

A new concern has been the focus of discussion about whether or not a vaping device can be used for illegal drugs like crack cocaine. Vape devices include e-cigarettes, vape pens, and vaporizers or MODS. All vape devices have the same components which are a cartridge for containing the e-liquid or e-juice, a mouthpiece, a battery, and a heating component that is powered by a battery. None of these vape device operating pieces were designed for vaping a substance other than liquid nicotine or liquid CBD oils.

Can you vape crack cocaine

Vaping Crack Cocaine is a Growing Concern

The concern is that more and more young people are altering their vape devices to try and attempt to make them compatible with vaping crack and other drugs. The research that has been completed about this potentially dangerous trend is sparse. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) conducted a study on the ‘Use of Substances Other Than Nicotine in Electronic Cigarettes Among College Students’ recently. A total of 1,542 undergraduate college student e-cigarette users were asked if they had ever vaped anything other than nicotine in their vape device, and the 7% of the participants said yes.

Although the results of the study were not hugely alarming, what was worrisome is that because vaping nicotine is perceived as safer than smoking tobacco the same presumption may cross over towards hard drugs like crack, heroin, and meth.

Regarding the potential dangers of this young population using substances more dangerous than cannabis in e-cigarettes. Knowledge is limited regarding the public health impact of vaping cannabis or other illicit substances among college student populations. This study stresses the need for continued research regarding the vaping of cannabis and other illicit substances among college students… Among college-aged adults, the perception of e-cigarettes is generally favorable, and many of these young individuals are willing to experiment with e-cigarettes. This favorable perception and willingness to experiment is linked to beliefs that e-cigarettes are less harmful than traditional cigarettes. Furthermore, studies have found that individuals also perceive the use of substances such as cannabis to be safer when vaporized versus combusted (NCBI).

As the drug addiction epidemic continues, we expect more research to be done in this area. The vaping trend is exploding in popularity and now is a multi-billion dollar industry. Analysts expect the growth in interest to continue for years to come as less young adults are smoking traditional cigarettes.

Vape Devices and Other Illegal Drugs

Other less formal polls have been conducted and confirm the findings of the NCBI, that young people are experimenting with illegal drugs in their vape device. The United Kingdoms media publication ‘The Sun’ published an article about the results from a poll conducted at Kings College in London. A solid 39% of the people polled admitted to vaping drugs other than nicotine in their vape device.

Dr. Matthew Blundell and colleagues at King’s College London polled 861 people, e-cig users. Some 39 percent admitted vaping illegal drugs. Up to 2.6million Brits use e-cigs, so about a million may have used them illegally. Rogue substances can be added to water then vaporized, or e-cig liquids containing drugs can be bought online. Other drugs reported as being vaped include ketamine, GHB, and LSD. (The Sun).

The truth is that vape devices do not heat crack, heroin, or meth to a high enough temperature to vaporize them. Documented attempts report that the filters in the vape devices clog and therefore ruin the drugs altogether. The truth is that vaping nicotine has become one the most addictive pastimes, masked as an improvement in health or lifestyle. Younger generations have been fooled into believing that vaping is less harmful and therefore, less addictive than smoking cigarettes, but this is simply a lie. The nicotine content in vape liquids is 3-4 times higher than in a regular tobacco cigarette.

Vaping Drugs is Very Dangerous

The biggest concern about the issue of vaping and illegal drug use is developing an addiction. Crack cocaine is one of the most addictive drugs because of it’s instant and powerful high. Crack cocaine addicts go on binges that last for months and years at a time. The overwhelming feelings of euphoria that crack-cocaine causes are extreme, and this is why crack addicts continuously smoke crack once they start, they are forever chasing the high.

Attempting to vape anything other than what a vape device was developed for is extremely dangerous. By altering a vape device, a person risks poisoning themselves, causing irreversible lung and brain damage as well as causing permanent damage to their health. If you or someone you know is attempting to vape crack or other drugs, there is help available. Recreate Life Counseling has crack cocaine drug programs that have helped people quit and remain off crack for good.

Our programs are successful because they utilize evidence-based forms of therapy to treat crack addiction. Our cross-disciplinary team of psychiatric, medical doctor ns addiction recovery counselors works together to design an individualized treatment plan tailored to meet each client’s personal needs.

Day and Night Treatment vs. Inpatient Rehab

People struggling with substance abuse often have to make a choice between several treatment options. Recovery programs for alcohol and drug addiction are broadly categorized into two: Inpatient and Outpatient rehab programs. There are also a number of modifications in-between.

One unique and highly personalized approach to treating substance abuse offered by Recreate Life Counseling is our Day and Night Addiction Treatment with Community Housing. The purpose of this treatment program is to strike a balance between two extremes. Understanding the differences between the various treatment plans offered by most rehab centers will have you well prepared for the challenges ahead.

 

Who Are Inpatient Rehab Programs Best Suited For?

Depending on the intensity of an individuals’ addiction, our clinicians and addiction professionals complete a comprehensive assessment during the intake process before a patient is placed in the appropriate level of care. Before admission into the day and night treatment program, our team wants to have a clear picture of the circumstances and drug addiction history that led our clients to reach out for help. This way a personalized treatment plan can be tailored to match the needs of all patients.

Inpatient rehab programs require the client to be on site twenty four hours per day. In this level of care, patients live at the rehab center where all of the treatment, counseling, and therapy occurs. This program is recommended for addicts with a chronic and long history of drug or alcohol addiction, where other methods of treatment have failed. Intensive care and close supervision in a long-term residential treatment facility are certainly advantageous, but it’s not the only way to get clean and sober.

Although having a number of benefits, inpatient rehab programs may not be suitable for everyone. For example, inpatient rehab is comparatively more expensive than day and night treatment. Also, it disrupts your everyday activities, making you unable to meet your obligations to family, friends, and employers. You’re stuck at the rehab facility around the clock, unable to leave.

Some benefits of choosing an inpatient rehab treatment program include:

  • Eliminates environmental and social risks factors that can act as triggers
  • 24 hours access to medical care and support
  • Helps you concentrate on recovery by cutting off distractions of daily life
  • Better success rates

How Day and Night Addiction Treatment Works

Our unique Day and Night Treatment programs are structured to provide clients with a conducive environment that nurtures high success rates and minimizes relapses. We have monitored and structured recovery residences that clients are transported to after completing therapy at the rehab center for the day. Living in our state-of-the-art community residential quarters ensures you receive 24 hours support from our staff.

Unlike inpatient treatment, a major differentiating factor is that in day and night treatment, you live at an off-site recovery residence that is supervised and managed by our behavioral health technicians. In day and night drug rehab, treatment sessions are conducted throughout the week during the day, with twelve-step meeting attendance in the afternoon. Daily therapy sessions may last between 3 and 5 hours. At the end of therapy sessions, our clients would typically return to their sober living residences.

While in Day and Night Drug Treatment, everyone receives individual and group therapy from trained addiction counselors and therapists. This is a very crucial part of the recovery process. You also learn communication skills and coping mechanisms which are invaluable for your reintegration into society. Being around people who understand your situation and share similar experiences gives added motivation to remain sober.

Day and night substance abuse treatment at Recreate Life Counseling is composed of a number of key components aimed at offering our clients an all-inclusive recovery option. Some unique features of our day and night rehab program include:

  • Community housing which provides an ideal environment for sober living
  • Weekly individual therapy sessions with our experienced recovery therapists
  • Daily group therapy sessions with other addicts in recovery, providing peer support and an avenue to learn and share experiences
  • Weekly psychotherapy sessions with our mental health experts
  • Family counseling sessions to get loved ones involved by providing the support needed in the recovery process
  • Aftercare planning and outpatient drug counseling designed to monitor your progress in the real world and offer a continuum of care

How to Choose the Most Suitable Recovery Program for You

When recommending a level of care, we consider each clients’ ability to function in their everyday environment without experiencing a relapse. If you are able to handle your cravings and deal effectively with the pressures of everyday life without falling back to drug abuse, then a day and night treatment is a suitable and effective recovery plan.

At Recreate Life Counselling, program flexibility is of great importance because it plays a major role in determining whether you will remain in recovery. We understand the challenges involved in successfully completing a recovery program. It’s our continued desire to make your stay in recovery as positive as possible, and it all begins with proper planning.

No matter the nature of your schedule, we have a treatment plan specially designed to meet the needs of each client. Our solutions-based approach ensures that your unique circumstances are given priority during the planning stage. We want you to be fully absorbed in the recovery process without any external influences.

Day and Night Drug Treatment at Recreate Life Counseling offers a safe and structured atmosphere for our clients, encouraging each person to learn how to take care of themselves, taking responsibility for your actions, self-discipline, along with other vital life skills.

If you wish to know more about how our Day and Night Addiction Treatment Plan works, please get in contact with our admission team. We guarantee that we will keep your information 100% confidential. We are available around the clock to help you plan and begin your journey to a drug-free future.

Is Heroin More Dangerous Than Other Opiates?

Out of all of the opiates out there, heroin is the most talked about. More lives are ruined by heroin than any other opioid-based drug, but is it more dangerous than other narcotics in this drug family? Let’s find out.

Heroin, also known as smack, China white or dope, is available as a white or brown powder or as a sticky, black substance (known as black tar). This highly addictive substance can be smoked, injected or snorted. Heroin is most commonly injected intravenously, giving the user an instant high. Once you’ve graduated to “shooting” (injecting) heroin, it’s very difficult to stop the habit on your own. The major psychoactive ingredient in heroin is diacetylmorphine (also known as diamorphine). This is a very potent painkiller that gives heroin it’s addictive attributes and causes a physical dependence with painful withdrawal symptoms. The effects of heroin abuse show that the substance is more dangerous than other opiates.

Largest Barriers To Addiction Recovery

Heroin Can Kill You

The risk of contracting blood-borne diseases (such as hepatitis and HIV) is increased through the use of heroin, especially when it’s injected. Long-term opioid use increases the risk of dangerous health problems, including kidney or liver disease, collapsed veins as well as heart infections. The risks can be worsened if heroin is taken with other substances like alcohol, which is called polysubstance abuse. In this case, your internal organs can decline in function, and there is always the risk of a fatal overdose.

Heroin is by far one of the most addicting drugs known to mankind. Results from many studies confirm the fact that a single dose of heroin can push an individual into addiction. About 25% of those that try heroin at a particular point in their life will become addicted to the substance. When the brain is continuously introduced to this opiate, the dopamine receptors within the nerve cells of the brain become exhausted as a result of overstimulation. Heroin is also 100 times stronger than morphine; this makes it one of the strongest opiates. Being a street drug, it is more prone to impurities than pharmaceutical opiates, adding another layer of danger and uncertainty for those addicted.

Facts About Heroin Addiction

The route through which heroin is administered also makes it more dangerous than other opiates. Addiction rates vary based on how heroin is consumed by the addict. Those that inject heroin are found to have higher dependence rates than those that smoke the substance (known as “chasing the dragon”).

Heroin is a potent street drug that is derived from morphine obtained from the seed resin of the opium poppy. According to Live Science, heroin yields the fastest-acting high out of all opiates. The fact that it is less expensive than prescription opiates makes it very popular on the street. In recent years, fentanyl is being added to street heroin to make it even more powerful. Dealers usually ‘cut’ heroin with other drugs to make it stronger and increase the price. The introduction of different substances ‘cut’ with heroin into the body makes it difficult for doctors treating a typical heroin overdose to pinpoint the specific substances involved. This can lead to life-threatening complications, including death. A report obtained from the National Institute on Drug Abuse revealed that deaths caused by heroin overdose increased by six times between 2001 to 2014, and the numbers keep increasing.

Get Help Today

If you or a loved one are addicted to heroin, reach out for help right now. We are fully aware of the pain you are going through and our compassionate specialists are here to guide you to recovery. Get in touch with Recreate Life Counseling and achieve freedom from heroin addiction forever.

Adderall Addiction Treatment Programs

Most college students and young adults have heard of Adderall. It’s used by many people in need of a performance boost in school, or those who are simply searching for a stimulant rush. 

Abuse of prescription drugs for non-medical use is a growing health crisis throughout the United States. Among young people in high school and college, there has been an upsurge in the abuse of prescription stimulants. The most popular of these drugs is Adderall, which is used for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Stimulant drugs come under various street names such as Speed, Vitamin R, and Uppers. They are very dangerous and addictive when misused or abused, that’s why our Adderall treatment programs are available to help alleviate this chemical dependency.

 

What Is Adderall?

Adderall is a prescription stimulant often recommended by doctors for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or narcolepsy. It is made up of a combination of two active ingredients – Dextroamphetamine and Amphetamine.

When used as prescribed by a physician, Adderall helps in heightening alertness, improving attention and increasing energy. It functions by increasing the amount of certain neurotransmitters in the brain.

Despite possessing beneficial therapeutic properties, Adderall and other prescription stimulants such as Ritalin also have a high potential for abuse. Prescription stimulants are often used by young adults to help in academic achievement, but occasional misuse often turns into full-blown drug addiction.

It’s almost impossible to tell which student will abuse or become addicted to prescription Adderall. In this regard, parents and guardians need to be alert as misuse of this drug over a period of time can result in violent behavior, anxiety, delusions, paranoia, and hallucinations.

How Young Adults Become Hooked On Adderall

Those addicted to Adderall and other prescription stimulants often start their addiction because of the false belief that Adderall will make them more productive, leading to better grades in school. This is common among young adults and college students who often misuse the drug in an effort to improve their mental performance. While studying for exams, some students misuse the drug as a “study aid” to achieve the highest test scores. In many instances, these students obtain the drug without a prescription. Over time, they become hooked unwittingly. Similarly, some adults also misuse prescription stimulants to help improve their memory or are simply looking for that Adderall stimulant rush, which is not unlike the street drug methamphetamine.

When Adderall is misused for reasons other than the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), it could result in serious health consequences such as addiction, psychosis, seizures and heart disorders. Some college students have also experienced incoherence and emotional numbing.

How to Recognize Warning Signs Of Adderall Abuse

It may be quite difficult to tell if someone is addicted to Adderall. This destructive habit is often done in secret without telling anyone. Adderall addicts become dependent on this drug by:

  • Taking more of the medication than prescribed
  • Prolonging the use of Adderall longer than prescribed by a physician
  • Obtaining more of the drug by using someone else’s medication or other people’s prescriptions

The following warning signs may indicate that your loved one is abusing or addicted to Adderall:

  • Anxiety
  • Diminished appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Increased fatigue
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia
  • Shortness of breath
  • Headaches
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Nausea
  • Low sex drive
  • Dizziness
  • Numbness in upper and lower limbs

Although these signs are not conclusive of Adderall abuse or addiction, they are indicative that you should reach out for help from an addiction professional.

Getting Help With Stimulant Abuse

Adderall addiction is a chronic condition that is created over time and becomes progressively worse. If left untreated, it may result in long-lasting damage to your loved one’s mental and physical health. Verbal confrontation or threats may do little to help in this situation. In fact, it may make a bad situation get even worse.

At times like these, you need the professional services offered at a drug recovery treatment facility. Our addiction professionals at Recreate Life Counseling are specially trained to assist addicts that want to break free from Adderall addiction and also manage unpleasant symptoms associated with discontinued use.

In our Adderall Addiction Treatment Programs, individuals will also learn the skills needed to handle everyday activities without resorting to drug abuse. Furthermore, staying in a drug-free environment keeps our clients away from tempting situations, thereby reducing the likelihood of a relapse.

Adderall Addiction Treatment: A Solution for Lasting Recovery

Choosing the right Adderall rehab can be quite challenging. We offer flexible, individualized treatment programs customized to meet each person’s unique circumstances. We do not believe in the classic “one size fits all” approach. Recovery from substance abuse is a complex process and we do not want to make it any more complicated. This is the reason why we structure our treatment plans around your circumstances, making the path to recovery a smooth experience.

Our team of addiction recovery counselors is available around-the-clock to plan every step of the Adderall rehab process. Whether you are looking for an intensive outpatient or day/night treatment program, we’ve got you covered. Long-term recovery from substance abuse is our goal from the moment a client steps through our doors. Throughout the years, we have been able to assist countless families affected by Adderall abuse. Let us help your loved one break free from stimulant addiction and live a sober, drug-free life once again.

Most Effective Addiction Treatments, According to Science

Most Effective Addiction Treatments, According to Science

Addiction is one of the largest medical conundrums in modern history. It continues to claim countless lives, and many treatment methods fail addicts who are desperately trying to get clean. In fact, of the 23.5 million Americans addicted to alcohol or drugs, only about 1 in 10 receives treatment. And the statistics for those who attend treatment are not so sunny either.

In a lauded study by Columbia University, researchers found that even though addiction is incredibly prevalent across the country, the availability of effective solutions is completely scarce. For the ten percent of addicts that receive care, only few receive anything that could be described as evidence-based treatment. Furthermore, medical professionals who are “treating” addiction across the country are largely unqualified. To add to it, misunderstandings and outdated traditions often dictate addiction treatment, which completely undermine any progress or evolution. The research proposes that addiction medicine be fully integrated into current healthcare systems. There must be more training for healthcare providers, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, psychologists and social workers. Furthermore, they prescribe regulation of addiction treatment programs, and mandated accountability for treatment consistent with proven standards. The researchers went so far as to suggest that current addiction practices could be considered medical malpractice.

  1. Thomas McLellan, co-founder of the Treatment Research Institute in Philadelphia, echoes this sentiment by saying, “There are exceptions, but of the many thousands of treatment programs out there, most use exactly the same kind of treatment you would have received in 1950, not modern scientific approaches.”

However, there are some individuals who are working to make sure that addiction treatment moves into the future. One such is Dr. Mark Willenbring, a former director of treatment and recovery research at the National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, who, among other things, is championing the use of medication-assisted treatment. This primarily entails the use of maintenance therapy with the drug suboxone for opioid addicts.

“We have some pretty good drugs to help people with addiction problems, but doctors don’t know how to use them,” he said. “The 12-step community doesn’t want to use relapse-prevention medication because they view it as a crutch.”

Among other medication-assisted treatment options, there lies the Sinclair Method. The Sinclair Method was discovered by Dr. David Sinclair. He hypothesized that alcohol produced reinforcement in the brain in a manner not dissimilar from opioids. Through years of research, he realized that alcohol did produce reinforcement via endorphins that bind with opioid receptors in one’s brain. He then concluded that an effective way to stop this dangerous reinforcement cycle would be to block the opioid receptors- after trying naltrexone, an opiate blocker, on rats, he decided it just may work for humans. The results in human trials have been very successful, and using extinction of the impulse to drink has had success with about 80 percent of those who have tried the method. Of course, the medication must be taken whenever one wants to drink.

If you are struggling with alcohol abuse disorder or substance abuse disorder, you will want to seek professionals who have a great knowledge of all current addiction treatment offerings. Truth Recovery Center has a large expertise on many evidence-based approaches and will create a treatment plan that is individualized and works for you.

The Trait That Can Identify Addiction

The Trait That Can Identify Addiction

10 AA Sayings That Will Inspire You in RecoveryAs America’s battle with addiction becomes more and more prevalent, people begin to wonder what exact traits predict addiction. Older stereotypes have suggested addicts have more in common than the we now know them to have. We can see now that addicts hail from every race, creed, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation and more. Yet, we can’t deny that there is a certain genetic element to the disease of addiction. After all, we can certainly see the evidence for it running in families.

So what is the commonality? Well, studies are beginning to suggest that the trait that most predicts addiction is impulsivity. This may not sound so surprising- but impulsivity shows up in more ways than you may think. Typically, impulsive people choose a smaller, faster reward over a larger, delayed reware. In layman’s terms, addicts are the ones that seek immediate gratification. Because of this, an important prevention tool is trying to overcome the delay when you don’t get what you want immediately. Learning to tolerate this delay is key, but still, it is genetically more difficult for some individuals, as their brains are wired to desire momentary gratification and rewards.

Though impulsivity is more common in those with addictive tendencies, it is a pretty common aspect of human life as well. It can be described as quick, momentary reactions to internal or external stimuli, often with unplanned consequences trailing behind. Though not everyone has this kind of thinking, and certainly not everyone applies this thinking to consuming drugs, this is a train of thought most can empathize with. Think about it- there are things we find ourselves doing even if we didn’t plan to. Eating that extra doughnut, buying a car we can’t afford, skipping the gym and going out. These impulsive behaviors represent the crux of addictive behavior.

So if we know the behavior that is generating addiction, does that mean we know the fix? Well, it isn’t that easy, but it is a start. A failure to resist impulse can now be described as the number one barrier addicts need to face in order to have a long-term strategy for success in recovery and life in general. However, this is a hard pattern to break, especially for individuals who much prefer immediate benefits to pleasures that occur far in the future.

It may give some comfort to know that the seasons of our life help to influence our impulsivity. Meaning, impulsive behavior is much more common at certain ages than others. It is estimated that impulsivity is at its highest levels during adolescence (around ages of 12) and levels off while moving toward adulthood (age of 20 years).

With this information in mind, it can be determined that impulsivity is often a prerequisite to addictive behavior and could be quite definitely used as a screening mechanism for future substance abuse.

10 AA Sayings That Will Inspire You in Recovery

10 AA Sayings That Will Inspire You in Recovery

Alcoholics Anonymous is an organization that is, in part, famous due to its cliches. Idioms like “progress, not perfection” and “willingness is key” are not only peppered throughout AA clubhouses and church multi-purpose rooms, but are part of modern vernacular as well. However, they are much, much more than just a cultural representation of the program of Alcoholics Anonymous. They are, to some, everything. These three or four word reminders help to encapsulate the program and put it in a form that is easily comprehended and digested by all. To stay sober, people need reminders of the bigger picture as well as feelings of commitment and loyalty to the program that keeps them sober. Some people new to the program might think that these statements seem simple, and they are, but the old-timers (and almost anyone in the program for that matter) will understand the beauty in their simplicity.

When people come into recovery, their lives are messy. They need a simple set of rules to live by, and AA offers that and more. Alcoholics Anonymous helps addicts and alcoholics pick themselves up by their bootstraps to repair their lives. These statements might not be the only thing at play when it comes to how an addict recovers, but they are certainly part of the formula. If you are new to the program, or just wanna refresh yourself on some awesome AA sayings, you will love our compilation of ten AA sayings that will help inspire you in recovery.

“Easy Does It”

This saying is definitely simple, but there is a beauty in its ease. It reminds all of us alcoholics and addicts to chill out, which is often what we need to hear. It reminds us of what is most important, rather than to be worked up about every menial task you have to perform in a day. Many addicts and alcoholics turned to drugs or the bottle because they could not cope with the daily stressors of each day. Part of recovery, a big part of it, is figuring out how to deal with the things that occur each day that would’ve triggered us in our past. Building healthy coping mechanisms is one of the most important parts of Alcoholics Anonymous as well as recovery in general. “Easy does it” embodies the central themes behind AA- stick to what’s most important, cut yourself a break, and above all, don’t use.

“We Are Only As Sick As Our Secrets”

It might seem a little intrusive to tell people about the most intimate parts of you and your life, but in AA, everyone understands, so social conventions are less of a big deal. You not only can, but should tell those you trust in AA the big things about you, your life and your story. This is especially true with your sponsor. Especially when you are reading your fourth step to them (the personal inventory you take as a part of completing the steps), you should be completely transparent. No one will judge you in AA. Whatever you have done, trust us, probably five people in your local AA meeting have done it too! If you do not disclose what is bothering you, past traumas or hurts, or current resentments, you will be less likely to get better. Relapse preys on the things that bother you that you do not disclose. Take a leap of faith, and share with your AA community today. The response will overwhelm you.

“First Things First”

“First things first” represents the fact that Alcoholics Anonymous is extremely solution-drive. Whatever happens, the Big Book, and the program itself, will encourage you to look at whatever you are face, figure out a logical step (with the help of prayer, meditation and your sponsor, of course) and proceed from there. Addicts and alcoholics have a tendency to not cope well with things or to blow things out of proportion, and this simple saying helps combat that negative behavior.

“One Day at a Time”

“One day at a time” is arguably the most popular saying of not only Alcoholics Anonymous but of Narcotics Anonymous as well. Both programs are based on the fact that alcoholics and addicts should not look at sobriety as a life sentence, but rather a thing to do each day. Many addicts and alcoholics come into the rooms after years of drinking and drugging, and a life without their crutch seems overwhelming. This is why it’s so important to keep sobriety one day at a time. It allows us to live in the present rather than start future-tripping about things we have no control over. If you keep telling yourself you can rethink sobriety tomorrow, and you say it every day, you’ll never take the drink. That’s a success in our book.

“Let Go and Let God”

However you feel God, the sentiment behind this quote is very meaningful and representative of AA. letting go and letting God embodies steps one through three of alcoholics anonymous- admitting your powerlessness, believing a higher power can restore you to sanity and choosing to turn your will over to this higher power. This is really the thesis of the whole program- we can’t recover alone, but we can with the help of God and the loving individuals in the rooms of AA.

 

Perhaps you’re still confused about the program of Alcoholics Anonymous. That’s perfectly natural- there is so much more to the program than just clever sayings. If you are an addict or alcoholic in need of recovery, look no further than Recreate Life. Recreate Life utilizes Alcoholics Anonymous and the twelve steps as well as renowned therapeutic approaches to combat the disease of addiction. Addiction is hard, but Recreate Life is dedicated to helping you and your loved ones beat it.

Recreate Life Counseling

“Science vs Spirituality?  No, Science AND Spirituality”

Recreate Life Counseling — So while I was doing my research last week, looking for something topical that fit the spirit of what the fine folks at Recreate Life Counseling do for addicts and alcoholics every day, I found an article about a drug that apparently DESTROYS the euphoric memories associated with cocaine use.  It’s only been used on mice so far, at least in this capacity, but it’s actually a cancer treatment drug that humans have used safely for years.  It’s neuroscience stuff, and therefore really complicated, but the upshot is this:  it’s a drug that shows great promise in eliminating the terrible cravings that make early recovery from the use of cocaine and other drugs.  More importantly though, at least for our purposes, is how this experiment points to an unnecessary tension between the findings of science and the spiritual approach to recovery so often emphasized in support and treatment centers.  It’s a minefield that counselors at Recreate Life Counseling negotiate constantly, so I wanted to expound on this a bit.

It’s something you encounter all the time, even at Recreate Life Counseling, scientifically minded folks and people who emphasize spirituality and connectedness eyeballing one another suspiciously across the table, as though they were different teams trying to win a game that doesn’t exist.  The Science vs Spirituality game doesn’t exist because there’s nothing to contest, nothing to fight about.  Science vs Spirituality is a made up distinction, what fancy philosopher types call a false binary.  There’s just one team, folks.  And the only way to win is to reduce the terrible suffering and social costs of active addiction.  Recreate Life Counseling understands this implicitly, and offers the best of both worlds in their therapeutic models, but for some reason the wider world doesn’t get this yet and the phony debate rages on.  

Look, I don’t know much.  But I can read and I can be open minded when staying all sewn up starts to hurt too much.  And everything I’ve read and seen tells me this:  that science and spirituality end up doing remarkably similar things and need each other more than they realize.  If I go to Recreate Life Counseling for my cocaine addiction, they’re not just going to give me a pill that eliminates my craving for drugs and send me on my way.  If they did, I’d be back in a month with brand new cravings from all the coke I snorted while I was away.  That’s because I don’t know to live!  I don’t know how to connect or treat people.  That’s where the emphasis on spirituality at Recreate Life Counseling comes in – it teaches me what I don’t know.  And the reverse holds true as well.  If there’s a chemical solution to my chemical part of my disease, I want you to give to me!  

So what we need is humility, true humility and an honest desire to solve the problem.  And both these traits tell me that I don’t have all the answers.  They tell me that Science vs Spirituality is a false debate.  And they tell me that what the world needs is to  heal, not ague.  

International Overdose Awareness Day 2016

International Overdose Awareness Day (IOAD) is a global event held on August 31st each year that aims to raise awareness of overdose and reduce the stigma of a drug-related death. IOAD also recognizes the grief felt by friends and families remembering those who have lost their lives by drug overdose. IOAD wishes to spread the message that the terrible tragedy of a drug overdose death can be prevented. IOAD originated in 2001 and has been spreading awareness of drug overdoses ever since.

The United States is in the midst of a drug overdose epidemic. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, it is estimated that in 2014, there were 207,400 drug-related deaths across the world, with overdose accounting for up to a half of all deaths and with opioids involved in most cases. According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, more people died from drug overdoses in 2014 than in any other year on record. Drug overdose deaths are up among both sexes, all races, and adults of nearly all ages. More than three out of five overdose deaths involve an opioid, such as prescription painkillers, heroin, morphine, and fentanyl. In 2014, overdose deaths involving an opioid killed more than 28,000 people in the United States, and more than half of those deaths resulted from prescription opioids.

What is a drug overdose?

An overdose means having too much of a drug or combination of drugs for your body to be able to cope with. All drugs can cause an overdose, including prescription medication prescribed by a doctor. There are a number of signs and symptoms that signal a drug overdose, and these differ depending on the type of drug used.

Signs of a Depressant Overdose

(e.g. heroin, morphine, oxycodone, fentanyl, methadone)

  • Shallow breathing; not breathing at all
  • Snoring; gurgling sounds
  • Blue lips or fingertips
  • No response to stimulus
  • Floppy arms and legs
  • Disorientation
  • Won’t wake up; unconsciousness

Signs of Alcohol Poisoning/Overdose

  • Disorientation
  • Loss of coordination
  • Seizures
  • Vomiting
  • Irregular or slow breathing
  • Blue-tinged or pale face
  • Hypothermia
  • Stupor
  • Unconsciousness

Stimulant Overdose

It is possible to overdose on amphetamines, such as speed and ice. Amphetamine overdose increases the risk of stroke, heart attack, or drug-induced psychotic episodes. Amphetamine overdoses differ from an opioid overdose.

  • Chest pain
  • Disorientation/confusion
  • Severe headache
  • Seizures
  • High temperature
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Agitation; paranoia
  • Hallucinations
  • Unconsciousness

It’s important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of an overdose, so that lives can be saved.

Recovery Is Possible

Recovery from drug and alcohol addiction is possible, and professional help is available to get you started on the right track. If you are struggling with an addiction, or have a loved one who is addicted, please seek support as soon as possible. You do not need to become part of the statistics — help is available.