Does Adderall Work as a Study Drug?

Adderall is the name brand for a combination drug that includes four salts of amphetamine and is often referred to as a “study drug” because students notoriously take the drug before big exams to help them stay focused. When Adderall is taken as prescribed, it can be beneficial in relieving symptoms of attention-related disorders, like attention deficit disorder (ADD). However, when taken other than as prescribed and used as a study aid, taking Adderall can be risky. Not only is the drug habit-forming, but it can lead to a series of serious health complications – including abuse and addiction.

Adderall can only be prescribed by a medical professional. If someone is taking Adderall to study and they were not personally prescribed the medication, they are abusing it – taking any prescription medication other than as prescribed is considered drug abuse. However, because college students take the drug so frequently, many fail to consider the serious health risks involved. It is important to recognize that even if you’re surrounded by others who utilize the drug for “academic” purposes, it is still dangerous and illegal to do so.

Does Adderall Work as a Study Drug?

The Side Effects of Adderall Dependence

When Adderall is taken by someone who needs it, it will help them to focus on the task at hand. Those with ADD have an extremely difficult time concentrating on one thing at a time, which seriously hinders their productivity. When someone takes Adderall as a “study drug” and other than as prescribed, they will experience a host of side effects like the following:

  • Insomnia
  • Restlessness and agitation
  • Loss of appetite
  • Spiked blood pressure
  • Increased heart rate
  • Headaches
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

When people abuse Adderall they will find that tolerance builds quickly, meaning that a greater amount of the prescription drug will be required to produce the same result. Because Adderall is a powerful stimulant, the withdrawal period can be similar to cocaine withdrawal, leading to a variety of physical and psychological symptoms. In short, the medication might help someone study in the short term, but taking the drug you weren’t prescribed is never worth the risk.

Adderall Addiction Statistics

Take a look at the following statistics regarding Adderall addiction, which is far more prevalent and serious than people may think. If you or someone you love has been battling an addiction to a prescription medication of any kind, please feel free to give us a call today – we’ll gladly you walk you through potential treatment options and do all we can do get you started on the road to Adderall addiction recovery.

  • The three main groups of individuals that abuse Adderall include students and professionals, athletes and individuals with underlying eating disorders.
  • A 2018 report estimated that in the U.S. alone, over 54 million individuals over the age of 12 had abused a prescription medication at least once during their lives.
  • Out of these people, nearly 2 million had abused a prescription stimulant like Adderall.
  • Between the years 2006 and 2011, the rates of Adderall abuse skyrocketed. Overall, Adderall abuse rose by a staggering 67 percent, while emergency room visits related to prescription stimulants rose 156 percent.
  • Roughly 60 percent of Americans abusing Adderall in 2018 were found to be youth and young adults.
  • Teenagers generally believe that prescription drugs are safer than street drugs because they were initially prescribed by a professional – this isn’t the case. Prescription drugs can be just as dangerous, if not more dangerous.

Adderall Abuse and Recovery 

Fortunately, while the effects of Adderall addiction can be devastating, recovery is always an option. Our team of addiction specialists and medical professionals have helped men and women of all ages and personal backgrounds overcome serious Adderall addictions. Our comprehensive recovery program focuses on helping our residents get and stay sober while learning the tools they need to go on and lead healthy and drug-free lives. For more information, give us a call today.